Rachel Long

16
Dec

Fishery Improvement Project Coordinator
Toronto, Canada

Rachel has combined her interests of marine biology and anthropology into a career connecting communities with fisheries science and management initiatives. She enjoys collaborating with commercial fishers on projects that work towards fisheries sustainability, and strive to find balance between conservation interests and resource use. Rachel joined Blue Ventures in June 2016 and is responsible for coordinating the Fishery Improvement Project, also known as a FIP, for the octopus fishery in Southwest Madagascar. This project works alongside all fishery stakeholders (government agencies, the national marine institute, other NGOs, commercial seafood exporters, community partners) to improve octopus fishing techniques and management according to the Marine Stewardship Council’s fisheries standards.

Before Blue Ventures, Rachel worked on fisheries projects for various governmental, non-governmental, and industry organisations in Canada and the United States. Some of these include, analysing fisheries policy with Ontario’s Ministry of Natural Resources, managing an electronic fisheries monitoring project with the Gulf of Maine Research Institute, as well as biological sampling aboard lobster fishing boats for Fundy North Fishermen’s Association. Prior to this, Rachel graduated with a Masters in Applied Science that explored fisher’s perspectives of ecosystem-based fisheries management.

Recent Publications:

Long, R. D., Charles, A. and Stephenson, R. L. 2016. Key principles of ecosystem-based management: the fishermen’s perspective. Fish and Fisheries. Available at:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/faf.12175/full

Long, R. D., Charles, A. and Stephenson R. 2015. Key principles of marine ecosystem-based management. Marine Policy 57: 53-60. Available at:

http://authors.elsevier.com/sd/article/S0308597X1500024X.

Long, R. et al. 2015. Operationalizing Open-Source Electronic Monitoring Systems in New England Groundfish Sectors. In: G.H. Kruse et al. (eds.), Fisheries Bycatch: Global Issues and Creative Solutions. Alaska Sea Grant, University of Alaska Fairbanks. Available at:

http://seagrant.uaf.edu/bookstore/pubs/AK-SG- 15-01.html

Pin It on Pinterest