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Madagascar’s small-scale fishers take ownership of marine protection through their national language

Madagascar’s small-scale fishers take ownership of marine protection through their national language
7
Nov

Small-scale fishers around Madagascar have announced a new Malagasy language definition of a key piece of terminology used to discuss marine protection around the world. 

The new term – which has been formally recognised by the Malagasy Academy, the public institution responsible for the country’s linguistics – has been announced by the MIHARI Network which represents many of the country’s fishing communities. 

The English language term ‘locally managed marine area’ (LMMA) is used globally to define areas of ocean managed by coastal communities to help protect fisheries and safeguard marine biodiversity. ‘Lamina enti-Mitantanana ny Morontsiraka sy An-dranomasina’ is the new Malagasy version of the term, and has been created in order to be inclusive of the fishers who manage these areas, and to give national recognition of Madagascar’s small-scale fisheries contribution to the country’s livelihoods. 

While retaining the acronym, the new translation of LMMA is not a literal one of this widely recognised concept. The Malagasy iteration refers to ‘a management plan for marine and coastal areas’ as opposed to local management of a marine area. 

The network was incubated by Blue Ventures and has now formally started its journey towards full legal autonomy as a national civil society platform representing a national network of LMMAs within Madagascar.


Learn more about the MIHARI Network

Find out more about MIHARI’s journey to independence


 

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